Aboriginal

Children Have Power

An amazing book of letters from elementary children in Ottawa and Gatineau standing in solidarity with First Nations children. Published by First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada. Click here to order or view sample pages.

First Nations Child & Family Caring Society of Canada Educational Resources

The program: Education for reconciliation and social justice: Bringing the Shannen’s Dream, Jordan’s Principle, and I am a witness campaigns into the classroom. Each of these resources is available in four (4) formats: Kindergarten to Grade 2, Grades 3-6, Grades 7-8, Grades 9-12

I am witness  
Shannen’s Dream
Jordan’s Principle 

Nunavut Social Services Review

In September 2010, CWLC was awarded a contract by the Government of Nunavut to serve as the lead organization to conduct a review of Nunavut’s social service system. Following the delivery of the Social Service Review Report the CWLC was invited to assist in crafting the program, policy and strategic responses to a number of the Report’s recommendations.
 
CWLC has been assisting on a range of initiatives that are designed to respond directly or indirectly to the recommendations of the Nunavut Social Service Review and the Report of the Auditor General of Canada.

 

October 7, 2011 - The National Aboriginal Health Organization announce the release of Inuit Child Welfare and Family Support: Policies, Programs and Strategies, on which CWLC collaborated. Please click here to read the press release. To read the full report, please click here. For more information, please click here.

July 2011 - The CWLC publishes The Nunavut Social Services Final Report. The intent of this Report is to focus on concrete and practical recommendations and accompanying suggested steps that can lead to meaningful change. This report is available in English, French, Inuinnaqtun, and Inuktitut.

Aboriginal Peoples Survey, 2006: Inuit Health and Social Conditions

This report focuses on selected social determinants of Inuit1 health. Information on health status is provided through data on self-reported health and chronic conditions. Determinants such as access to health care, education, housing, harvesting and country food consumption are examined.

Statistics Canada
Additional Resources


An Overview of the Child Welfare Systems in Canada

Overview of Canada's child welfare system from one part of the country to another. Systems are currently structured to respond to reports of child maltreatment but are generally not well-funded to take action in preventative measures.

Author(s): 
Pamela Gough
Author(s): 
Aron Schlonsky
Author(s): 
Peter Dudding
2009
International Journal of Child Health and Human Development
Additional Resources


Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare Final Report

The Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare (CECW) has been one of four Centres of Excellence for Children’s Well-Being, established in 2000 as an initiative of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). The CECW brought together a network of child welfare practitioners, community-based child and family service organizations, child welfare researchers, advocacy and resource groups, child welfare policy-makers, and government ministries to share knowledge and build capacity in child welfare.

The CECW’s mandate has been to work at a national level to disseminate evidence-based knowledge on the incidence, characteristics, and effects of abuse and neglect on children and youth, as well as to transfer knowledge on the most effective ways to alleviate and prevent child maltreatment. This mandate also included fostering collaborative research and providing expert policy advice and recommendations to government agencies and organizations at the provincial, territorial, and local levels. As a special point of interest, the CECW has been active in the field of Aboriginal child welfare and has been an integral part of fostering reconciliation, promoting healing, increasing knowledge, and developing new practices to increase the health and well-being of Aboriginal children at risk of abuse and neglect.

2010
CECW
Additional Resources


CIHR Guidelines for Health Research Involving Aboriginal People

These guidelines offer the kind of safeguards that have long been missing for Aboriginal people participating in research. The ultimate result is the development of health research ethics guidelines that respond to the pressing needs of the Aboriginal community.

Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR)
Additional Resources


Doing Better for Children

The well-being of children is high on the policy agenda across the OECD. But what is the actual state of child well-being today? How much are governments spending on children and are they spending it at the right times? What social and family policies have the most impact during children’s earliest years? Is growing up in a single-parent household detrimental to children? Is inequality that persists across generations a threat to child well-being? Doing Better for Children addresses these questions and more.

Author(s): 
Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development
2009
Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development
Additional Resources


Economic Impact of Children in Care of FASD: Phase 1 (Manitoba)

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a serious social and health problem for the child welfare, health and education systems in North America with significant social and economic costs. Meeting the needs of children with disabilities creates significant challenges for child welfare agencies.

Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare
Additional Resources


First Nations, Métis and Inuit Children and Youth: Time to Act

The report provides a portrait of Aboriginal peoples from the perspective of the communities and social connections on which children and youth depend. The report also provides examples of what is working and recommendations for the way forward.

National Council on Welfare
Additional Resources


Hand-in-Hand: A Review of First Nations Child Welfare in New Brunswick

The Ombudsman and Child and Youth Advocate in New Brunswick has recommended sweeping changes to the child welfare system on First Nations, reducing the number of agencies to three from the current 11.
 
He called for the establishment of a single First Nations Child and Family Services Office that would provide financial and administrative functions to the three agencies, and made recommendations related to funding, governance, service delivery standards, training and accountability.
 
He also delved into the deep-seated issues affecting First Nations communities, such as poverty, drug addictions, domestic violence, and the erosion of the Mi'kmaq and Maliseet cultures and languages.
Author(s): 
Ombudmsan of New Brunswick
2010
Government of New Brunswick
Additional Resources


Many Hands, One Dream

Principles for a new perspective on the health of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children and youth.

Author(s): 
Cindy Blackstock, Dawn Bruyere & Elizabeth Moreau
Additional Resources


Milestones - Saskatchewan Child Advocate's Report 2009

 
The Advocate tabled his fifth annual report in the Saskatchewan Legislature today with a commentary that highlighted the significant events that positively impacted the children and youth of Saskatchewan in 2009.
Author(s): 
Saskatchewan Child Advocate
2009
Office of the Child Advocate (Saskatchewan)
Additional Resources


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